Do They Hear You When You Cry


Full of good guys and bad guys, lush landscapes, barren prison cells, love, courage, despair, and cruelty. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Praise "A fascinating story…not only one of horror but of great humanity. Looking for More Great Reads? Download our Spring Fiction Sampler Now.

LitFlash The eBooks you want at the lowest prices. Read it Forward Read it first. Unbound Worlds Exploring the science fiction and fantasy universe. Stay in Touch Sign up. We are experiencing technical difficulties. Her real trial started at this point. Treated like a criminal, and not a refugee fleeing for her life, she was locked up in high security prisons and treated like filth.

For the details, just read the book. It's way too shocking! The racism inherent even in acceptance of immigrants is pretty evident throughout the book, and especially at the statistics quoted at the end. The book is definitely worth a read since Kassindja's case led to some reforms, and ensured that women fleeing from FGM are considered as legitimate refugee cases. However, the issue of detention of refugees and their mistreatment still continues, not just in the US but all around the world. Nov 23, Amanda rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: This is one of those stories which, if it were fiction, it would be totally unbelievable.

It's the story of a young Togolese woman who flees Togo to escape an arranged marriage and genital mutilation, only to get trapped in the immigration system upon arriving in the US. As I was reading this book, I would have given it four stars- the writing could have been more concise and there were some stylistic things that I didn't like.

Do they hear you when you cry

But by the end, I was so heartbroken and angry for Fauziya that to r This is one of those stories which, if it were fiction, it would be totally unbelievable. But by the end, I was so heartbroken and angry for Fauziya that to rate it any lower would have been wrong. The writing is simple if you scan over some of the legalese and straightforward and utterly poignant.

Jan 09, Dana rated it it was amazing. Fauziya Kassindja grew up in Togo, Africa in a privileged setting. Fauziya's father died suddenly and she was pulled out of school and put into an arranged marriage as a fourth wife and then told to prepare herself for FMG. Kassindja's sister went against her own husband to save her sister and help her to escape the country. But escape to what? Kassindja ended up going the the US and applying for as Fauziya Kassindja grew up in Togo, Africa in a privileged setting. Kassindja ended up going the the US and applying for asylum.

The customs officers immediately sent her to jail where she was kept for sixteen months. Fauziya was treated worse than the worst offender as she had no status. She was housed with murderers. Her health deteriorated to near death without any concern of any official. Kassindja was lucky in that her cousin went above and beyond to help her and she met Layli Bashir, a law student and Karen Musalo, a refugee lawyer who helped her and eventually got her asylum. This book really puts the immigration policy of the United States under intense scrutiny.

I believe that Canada's policy is much the same although evidently we were among the first to grant asylum for FMG applicants. Kassindja was a brave and very strong person to withstand all the trials and tribulations and yes, cruelty she encountered on her journey. There has to be a better way to grant asylum to those who truly need it and send away those who don't.

Every single person should read this book as a means to better understand political imprisonment, human rights and how immigration policies do not work.

See a Problem?

Start by marking “Do They Hear You When You Cry” as Want to Read: For Fauziya Kassindja, an idyllic childhood in Togo, West Africa, sheltered from the tribal practices of polygamy and genital mutilation, ended with her beloved father's sudden death. Forced into an arranged. Do They Hear You When You Cry Paperback – January 12, For Fauziya Kassindja, an idyllic childhood in Togo, West Africa, sheltered from the tribal practices of polygamy and genital mutilation, ended with her beloved father's sudden death. Forced into an arranged marriage at.

Dec 16, Winter Sophia Rose rated it it was amazing. Jul 28, Jeanette rated it liked it. Here is Fauziya telling her life's story. I applaud her courage in several avenues. First and especially, in the continued need she consistently exhibits to demand that female mutilation becomes unacceptable and worthy of the condemnation that it so deserves. Especially in Africa and the Middle East, and within worldwide medical associations.

It's a cause of misery and terrible outcomes, life-long, for a woman's health and natural barriers against infection. Besides the brutalit Here is Fauziya telling her life's story. Besides the brutality and trauma of the cutting operation itself, its long term consequences are even more horrific. But second and more than that, I applaud her ability to judge this escape as she did, from deep within her own cultural dichotomy of conflicting influences. Because she still doesn't acknowledge some of the negatives of her own culture and tribal beliefs, that she does accept as normal.

Saying all that, I thought the telling itself was jagged and endlessly rough. Earlier childhood and the period up until her Father's death was ok but held many redundant phrases and repeating information. After her Mother left, it is so reactive and scattered with emotional upheavals and sometimes rants- that in some aspects, as bad as the facts surrounding her life and choices became? Well, she did the right thing, but at times was also her own worst enemy.

  • Do They Hear You When You Cry?
  • Related Articles;
  • .
  • ;
  • ?
  • International Review of Cytology: A Survey of Cell Biology: 153 (International Review of Cell and Mo!
  • Womens Influence on Classical Civilization!

Her own perceptions of others' cultures? Fauziya holds her own tribal identity mores and they do seem to give her a strong self-identity. And they served her eventual choices well. De plaats waar de hoofdpersoon vandaan komt is in Togo, 20 km van een plaatsje in Ghana waar ik zelf ben geweest.

  • Learn Spanish - Level 6: Lower Intermediate Spanish Volume 2 (Enhanced Version): Lessons 1-25 with A.
  • Menù di un manager libertino (Italian Edition).
  • Included or Excluded?: The Challenge of the Mainstream for Some SEN Children.
  • Finance for IT Decision Makers: A Practical Handbook for Buyers, Sellers and Managers (Practitioner ?
  • Kundenbindung im Web 2.0. Chancen im Business-to-Consumer-Bereich (German Edition).
  • Dei Sepolcri di Ugo Foscolo (Italian Edition).
  • The United Nations and the Maintenance of International Security: A Challenge to be Met^L Second Edi;

De omgeving en de sfeer wordt zo goed omschreven in het eerste deel van het boek dat het even leek of ik weer in dat gebied rond liep. Hoe donker de nachten zijn, hoe het landschap er uit ziet, de littekens in het gezicht van de mensen als stamkenmerk, hoe de mensen hun bagage vervoeren op hun hoofd, het reizen in de trotrobusjes, de verkopers, de huizen, het eten, de snoeren van kra De plaats waar de hoofdpersoon vandaan komt is in Togo, 20 km van een plaatsje in Ghana waar ik zelf ben geweest. Hoe donker de nachten zijn, hoe het landschap er uit ziet, de littekens in het gezicht van de mensen als stamkenmerk, hoe de mensen hun bagage vervoeren op hun hoofd, het reizen in de trotrobusjes, de verkopers, de huizen, het eten, de snoeren van kralen om het middel van de kinderen, de vrouwen die de fufu aan het stampen zijn Het tweede deel van het boek was voor mij iets minder boeiend.

Dat ging over hoe slecht asielzoekers in de VS behandeld werden. De hoofdpersoon is haar land ontvlucht omdat ze bepaalde zaken in haar cultuur niet wil ondergaan. Ondanks alles, zet ze haar cultuur niet negatief neer. Dec 13, Katie rated it really liked it Recommended to Katie by: This book made me really interested in the process of claiming asylum. I've never thought much about asylum, but reading a personal account of someone suffering through the process really made me more interested in learning more about those seeking asylum.

Dec 07, taaza rated it it was amazing. I was really blown away by this book - in fact, I think it is one of the best, if not the best - that I have read yet this year. An African girl of 17 years of age tries to get political asylum to escape "kakia" or FGM as she flees Togo by way of Germany and then the U.

This was a painful but incredible description of her ordeal in prison and finally the legal difficulties endured as her legal team worked day and night trying to get asylum granted. Fascinating and absorbing, a must-read for wo I was really blown away by this book - in fact, I think it is one of the best, if not the best - that I have read yet this year.

Fascinating and absorbing, a must-read for women and women rights advocates everywhere, but this is a truly a book for everyone. I may make a ring out of this at a later date. Feb 07, Amanda Dodge rated it liked it.

While this book is a little outdated published not much has changed by the way of treatment of refugees and asylum seekers. I never expected this book to be so topical, but it's all I've been thinking about with the travel ban. Fauziya never wanted to leave her country. She had no idea what legal rights or options she had when she landed in America. To say that people land here for terrorism and to abuse the system is a ridiculous broad sweep of a tiny minority. She needed help and our sys While this book is a little outdated published not much has changed by the way of treatment of refugees and asylum seekers.

She needed help and our systems failed her. May 19, Calzean rated it really liked it Shelves: Fauziya is a 17 year old Togo young woman is bought up in a fairly liberal but religious family. Her life is going well, they are not poor, she is going to school and her family is a loving one. A more traditional, and certainly spiteful, man the uncle marries her off as the fourth wife but before the marriage is consummated she will have to undergo female circumcision. Luckily her m Fauziya is a 17 year old Togo young woman is bought up in a fairly liberal but religious family.

Luckily her mother and sister come to her rescue and get her out of the country. After a short stay in Germany she lands in the USA, the land of the free and land of immigrants. And here she sent to a detention centre then a series of prisons while her plea for asylum is reviewed. The book is mainly about her case and the changes in laws and procedures to recognise that women can be persecuted in unique ways. At times her treatment is appalling, the insensitivity of legal professionals and prison staff is inhumane but a few good people help to free her after 18 months.

Oct 18, Patti rated it really liked it. It took me a while to get throught his book. Fauziya is very detailed about her journey, not leaving out details about her traumatic experience, even giving detailed background stories about her legal representation. One of the most striking things about this book is that Fauziya is about the same age as me, so I kept thinking about what I was doing when she was going through everything. On the Travel Channel, you can watch shows about being "Locked up Abroad" which show the horrible conditions i It took me a while to get throught his book.

On the Travel Channel, you can watch shows about being "Locked up Abroad" which show the horrible conditions in overseas prisions. You don't think of America as being the place where someone is treated subhuman. She was caught in a horrible limbo, in America, but without any rights - waiting for her day in court. It also really stood out to me that throughout her ordeal, Fauziya never seemed to lose her faith in God and the Qur'an.

  • Maturity & Youth!
  • SheSpeak: Conversations of my Sisters in Verse?
  • Do They Hear You When You Cry – bolstergroup.com.
  • !
  • Do They Hear You When You Cry by Fauziya Kassindja | bolstergroup.com.

Even though she was fleeing a culture that allowed and encouraged female gential mutilation and taking rights away from women, she seperated those practices from her faith. Jan 17, Ruby rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: This book should absolutely be required reading in the western world. Absolutely appalling that immigrants are treated as criminals and worse because under US law they officially have no rights. This is a devestating story, and I'm glad that Kassindja had the strength to tell it. I want to buy several copies of this book and hand them out to people. Jan 23, S'hi rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Covering the unusual freedoms of a family background which allowed her four older sisters to marry men of their own choosing, Fauziya explains how everything went wrong for her when her beloved father died while she was away at boarding school in Ghana as a 16 year old student.

Especially for a woman. By contrasting the choices her own parents made against the traditions of many in the tribal society in which they grew up , we are introduced to prevailing attitudes and traditions with a little distance. Then gradually as the tale unfolds we gain deeper insights into the variety of ways in which such traditions oppress the people who come to believe in perpetuating them. The strangest part of this story is how long it takes the Fauziya herself to understand just what it was her mother and sister were working so hard to save her from.

Especially one who already has three other wives. The veil of silence around practices of female circumcision is such that she cannot comprehend what she knows others fear on her behalf. She only knows that some have died. And she knows the cultural reticence to speak of private things. They evict her mother while Fauziya and her younger brother are away at school, refuse to let her return to her studies, and arrange her marriage.

She does not agree. As I read these passages I wondered how many Western women would be able to associate their own experiences with this tension between obedience and the subtleties of family persuasion. They have not been as all encompassing in the society around me as they were for these West African societies. But in their own way they have bee4n as subtle and unquestionable. It is the very silence around these subjects which makes it so difficult to act beyond the behaviours of others. It is as if you cannot possibly do what you are limited to think about.

What you cannot put into words, cannot be put into action. And yet I find it difficult to speak to her of these things. But my daughter has choice about these things.

Do they hear you when you cry

Many African women do not. In fact, the women themselves seem to be the ones who perpetuate these traditions onto their own daughters. And it is not just some form of body decoration. It goes to the very core of what it means to be a woman. During her two months there she is lucky enough to find a kind woman who puts her up, and another African who suggests she seek asylum in America. But rather than finding freedom in America, she goes through a gruelling confrontation with the legal system which denies her arrival in the land of the free.

Mostly this book outlines the processes and procedures involved in this long ordeal. And especially the point at which it shifts from being the story of one young woman to being the test case for many others like her who are also fleeing their own countries for their own health, safety and their very lives.

Submit a resource to us!

At times as I read these thick volume I was reminded of the story of Lindy Chamberlain, who was charged with the murder of her own baby daughter who she claimed was taken from the family tent by a dingo while they were camping at Ayers Rock in Central Australia. There are two main reasons for this. The deep religious conviction of a little understood faith, and the prejudices against women in defining their own relationships within the world. There are many layers of experience, and of issues, within the story Fauziya shares with us here.

Item Preview

She hopefully seeks political asylum in the U. According to tribal tradition her uncle took charge of Fauziya's life and her father's home and fortune. Jan 23, S'hi rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Her family were devout Muslims, but her parents were more traditional and opposed FGM. Ultimately, in a landmark decision in immigration history, Fauziya Kassindja was granted asylum on June 13, The only difference between she and I was that she was of the Kpelle tribe and had lived in a village all her life, whereas I was a city girl from a political family:

Reading this landmark case gives great insight into how and why these practices persist. Sep 16, Carol rated it really liked it. This book is the story of Fauziya Kassindja, a woman from Togo who fled to the United States to seek asylum. The first part of the book describes Fauziya's life in Togo as part of a large loving devoutly Muslim family. She is especially attached to her Dad. Her parents are both forward thinkers and did not choose to have any of their five daughters face kakia or female genital mutilation. They also permitted their daughters to choose their own husbands and marry for love.

In Togo marriages are often arranged by the family and a man may marry up to four women. This was socially acceptable in their family tribes but since Kassinja's father was a wealthy man he chose a different lifestyle for his daughters. Education was very important to her Dad and Fauziya was the youngest of the sisters. She was attending boarding school in Ghana when her Dad died. According to tribal tradition her uncle took charge of Fauziya's life and her father's home and fortune. Since her uncle and aunt had never liked Fauziya's mother they told her she was no longer welcome in her home and sent her away.

Upon Fauziya's return from school for the summer she was informed by her relatives that she was not going to be allowed to return to school as it was a waste of money. She was also informed that a marriage had been arranged for her with a man who was twenty years her senior and she was to become his fourth wife. And oh by the way he wanted her to be cut undergo kakia before consuming the marriage. Fauziya was incredibly distressed and with the aid of her oldest sister and with money sent by her mother she left Togo and flew to Germany where her uncle could not find her.

Fauziya knew no one in Germany but met a stranger at the airport who took her home and befriended her. In the time she spent in Germany Fauziya also met a man from Africa who told her she should seek asylum in the United States. He provided her with a passport which enabled her to leave Germany and fly to the U. So here in the land of the free is where Fauziya's nightmare began. And this is the heart of the book for me.

Do They Hear You When You Cry by Fauziya Kassindja

Of course I feel that forced female genital mutilation is a horrendous act and that forced marriage to a horny old man with three other wives is unconscionable but what occurred to Fauziya in the United States is beyond the scope of imagination. She was placed in four different prisons and did you know that illegal immigrants have no rights? Hey guys there is something wrong with this picture! She was placed in prison with murderers, had to face the fallout from a prison riot and was never shown the respect that every human being deserves.

User Survey

Fortunately she had a group of lawyers who were working to set her free and to set a precedent for other women seeking asylum. Her appeal for asylum was denied by a judge who had not read any of the briefs about her case. She was denied bail by another judge pending the appeal of her case. She became physically very ill and also very depressed. She had loving friends in the prisons who were fellow immigrants awaiting deportation.

She had caring lawyers and a cousin who all cared about her but the INS system put unbelievable roadblocks in the way. Her lawyers were able to get the press involved and her story became well known. So maybe she was released because of the press and publicity about her case and contacts to influential folks who recognized the criminality of how she had been treated.