WHOS KILLING THE GREAT WRITERS OF AMERICA? (A SATIRE)


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Thus, Stagolee is a perspective, a point of view. On the one hand, the figure represents the sense of exclusion and the subversive attitudes that relate it to the precursor text and the parody itself, i. The only reason, one must assume, that the disguise works at all is the apparent total ignorance of his interlocutors and audiences as to the origins of his name. Moreover, whereas Cecil Brown observes a development in the use of the Stagolee myth from a third person account to a first person narration Brown , Monk is careful to shift to a third person account every time he assumes the part of Stagg, in this way creating a kind of distance that allows him to tell the tale as if he were a reciter of a Stagolee toast or ballad as well as to cover up his ego on the written page.

When the two functions, that of Monk as a person and that of Monk as a performer of Stagolee, join, the author becomes the butt of his own satire. How uncomfortable he feels is evident when he prepares himself for his first appearance as Stagg R. I wondered how far I should take my Stagg Leigh performance.

I might in fact become a Rhinehart [sic! I yam what I yam. I could throw on a fake beard and a wig and do the talk shows, play the game, walk the walk, shoot the jive. I would let Mr. Leigh continue his reclusive, just-out-of-the-big-house ways. He would talk to the editor a few more times, then disappear, like down a hole. Like the Invisible Man, Monk is momentarily beguiled by the possibilities offered by B. These glasses not only transform him in the eyes of his beholders but also transform the world around him. Rinehart, as his two initials which stand for Bliss and Proteus suggest, may be taken as a metaphysical version of Stagolee, with ties to the Legba figure of Vodoun and the false savior myth.

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Gysin, The Grotesque This is a different kind of parody, if it is a parody at all. These allusive parallels from Chapter 9 onwards begin to act as signals and signposts of the progressively ambivalent condition in which Monk finds himself, a condition which is dominated by the clashes between political radicalism and aesthetic experiment, between commercial success and artistic betrayal Everett, Erasure , Leigh by revealing his real identity; the parallel to Invisible Man is again obvious: And so he decides to accept the prize in person, without disguise.

Most of these parallels stem from the last chapters of Invisible Man, in which the protagonist is confronted with riot, chaos, and existential crisis. That the chimera of Stagolee speaks the words of a white betrayer is the ultimate irony; it presents the avatar of vernacular power as a pawn in the hands of the white commercial establishment. Two of John A.

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Click Song , a more mainstream approach to the problems facing a gifted black writer. Ishmael Reed touched on the theme in his postmodern slave narrative Flight to Canada More germane to the thematics of Erasure may be two other postmodern approaches. The ambiguity of the relationship between author and work is suggested in the complex role Mason Ellis is playing: You, my son, have come to the end of your running.

The poem he sprays on the wall separating the ghetto from upper-middle-class housing turns him into a representative of the downtrodden, but the publication of a book entitled Watermelanin and the speech he delivers against the acquittal of the policemen who mistreated Rodney King has frightening side-effects: All three protagonists come to some kind of dead end, denying the rebirth that Ellison still envisages as a possibility in the Epilogue to Invisible Man. Different from the other two, Erasure highlights the process of parody in making the fate of a text imitate and satirize other texts central to the fate of the author.

Yet without stretching a point unduly such a reading might also be applied to the two novels mentioned above. Most postmodern African American novels call the concept of race into question, and there are, after all, quite a few African American authors who for various reasons disdain being earmarked as racial authors. The White Boy Shuffle. Bell , Bernard W.

How Mayo-phobia is KILLING AMERICA

Review of Erasure, by Percival Everett. African American Review The Adventures of Augie March. Elliott , Robert C. The Power of Satire: Placing the Experimental Novel. Forbes , Clarence A. Gill , James E. University of Tennessee Press. The University Press of Kentucky, The Grotesque in the American Negro Novel: Oxford University Press, Black Literature at the Crossroads.

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Cambridge University Press, My Amputations as Cubist Confession. New York and Boulder: The African-American Novelist under Erasure. Critical Perspectives Past and Present. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It took longer to read than I thought; I kept leaving it to check which details were based in fact! Kaplow has a wide knowledge of popular fiction by American authors, and had fun making fun of their styles.

Some I know only from movie versions. I've never read Danielle Steel or Curtis Sittenfeld, but now intend to touch on them. There are others I've never read and don't intend to. Will they become immortal? They aren't authors, as is not Truffa Bizarrely funny. They aren't authors, as is not Truffaut either, nor Gerard Depardieu.

I'm worried about the dead bodies. Feb 28, Cecily Kyle rated it it was ok. I really wanted to like this book and I will admit I had a couple laugh out loud moments but ultimately it was just bizarre and I felt like I was in the mind of a crazy person. Interesting idea just poorly executed. May 08, Clayton Yuen rated it really liked it. Tongue-in-cheek mystery was waaaaay out there, funny as heck A quick and delightful read Feb 08, April rated it liked it. This book is the epitome of weird -- so amusing and yet so strange.

The most prolific of writers are characters: Steve Martin, Gerard Depardieu, et cetera. It totally pokes fun at some of the most popular people in the world. It's like a vicarious revenge on all those writers you envy, who never seem to have a hard time putting words to paper and publishing book after book after book after book. By far the most amus This book is the epitome of weird -- so amusing and yet so strange. By far the most amusing, laugh-out-loud part of the book was Tom Clancy's chapter.

Oh, you know, words like "fascist" comes to mind. And Clancy's chapter was exactly as I expected. The description of him matches everything I've ever heard about him, and the fact that Ann Coulter has a cameo in his chapter just makes it all the more funny. I also like that each author's chapter matches their genre books in a way, and since Stephen King is the one author we follow from the beginning to the end, the entire book naturally ends the way all his books end. Did I mention that I don't particularly like how Stephen King's books end?

Stop reading this if you hate spoilers, but as interesting as the book is, as highly amusing and interesting the individual characters are, you follow the somewhat believable story in the sense that as weird as it is, it still could be plausible with all the suspense in the world, only to come to a strangely supernatural sort of ending, where suddenly some diabolically evil character that seems to come from some other world or underworld pops up and reveals all.

Like that dark character that always pops up in King's books and makes for a letdown ending. I never liked that. The rest of the book was still pretty good, though. Oh, and the cover quotes?

David Foster Wallace

Christmas gift from Cousin Zee. Finished reading February 8, Jan 25, Alison rated it it was ok Shelves: I was disappointed in this -- it sounded like something I'd really like. It's basically a satirical novel in which, as you may have guessed from the title, someone is killing American writers, and they mostly die in ways that mirror deaths in their books.

Stephen King sets out to solve the mystery, which ends in a completely bizarre, non-believable way.

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Robert Kaplow is a teacher and writer best known for the satirical songs and Mr . Kaplow has a wide knowledge of popular fiction by American authors, and. It's basically a satirical novel in which, as you may have guessed from the title, someone is killing American writers, and they mostly die in ways that mirror.

OK, believable if it were a King novel, but it's not. I found the pacing to be frantic, and the parodies of some of the characters to be a litt I was disappointed in this -- it sounded like something I'd really like. I found the pacing to be frantic, and the parodies of some of the characters to be a little over the top. It was a fast read one day, and not a full day of reading by any means , so if you want something quick and brainless this would do it. But I can't say that I would recommend it. Feb 27, Djrmel rated it liked it Shelves: You and I might not think Sue Grafton, Stephen King, Tom Clancy and the other writers who appear in this piece of Real Person Fiction are the great writers of America, but based on book sales, someone obviously does.

Reading Percival Everett

I therefore doff my hat to the playwrights, screenwriters, poets and songsters of satire by nominating for my final selection the fourth series of the legendary television program, Blackadder. I would let Mr. While the first three series, set at various times from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, all drew laughs from poking fun at hierarchy and custom, the final one, pitching Edmund Blackadder and his much-kicked sidekick Baldrik into the trenches of the first world war, morphs into a satire on class and privilege that is close enough in time to speak to our own world. The Outrun is a gorgeously evocative account of the role her home island played in helping to restore her to health. But with the publication of her Collected Stories a few years ago, there's now no excuse for not reading her.

It really did happen like that. Underneath the laughs is a powerful critique of demagoguery and our collective vulnerability to leaders who appeal with simplistic solutions to our baser instincts. By the way, have you heard the news? Donald Trump has been nominated as Republican candidate for the U. I therefore doff my hat to the playwrights, screenwriters, poets and songsters of satire by nominating for my final selection the fourth series of the legendary television program, Blackadder.

While the first three series, set at various times from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, all drew laughs from poking fun at hierarchy and custom, the final one, pitching Edmund Blackadder and his much-kicked sidekick Baldrik into the trenches of the first world war, morphs into a satire on class and privilege that is close enough in time to speak to our own world. To subscribe, click here. Simply close and relaunch your preferred browser to log-in. If you have questions or need assistance setting up your account please email pw pubservice.

New York Rights Fair. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. The House of God by Samuel Shem. Catch by Joseph Heller. Anything by Terry Pratchett. Animal Farm by George Orwell.

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