Recorded Music in American Life: The Phonograph and Popular Memory, 1890-1945


Kenney adds a sense of process, adds the music and the milieu to previous accounts, which have been more oriented toward or at least by the machine. She is the author of Scripts, Grooves, and Writing Machines: Representing Technology in the Edison Era Permission to reprint a review published here may be obtained only from the reviewer.

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'. View freely available titles: Book titles OR Journal titles. Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide.

  • Your First Year in Network Marketing: Overcome Your Fears, Experience Success, and Achieve Your Drea.
  • ;
  • ;
  • .
  • .
  • Introduction to Engineering Mechanics: A Continuum Approach.

Forged from a partnership between a university press and a library, Project MUSE is a trusted part of the academic and scholarly community it serves. Built on the Johns Hopkins University Campus.

"Recorded Music in American Life: The Phonograph and Popular Memory, 18" by William Howland Kenney

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless. Recorded Music in American Life: Have records, compact discs, and other sound reproduction equipment merely provided American listeners with pleasant diversions, or have more important historical and cultural influences flowed through them? Do recording machines simply capture what's already out there, or is the music somehow transformed in the dual process of documentation and dissemination?

How would our lives be different without these machines? Such are the questions that arise when we stop taking for granted the phenomenon of recorded music and the phonograph itself. Now comes an in-depth cultural history of the phonograph in the United States from to William Howland Kenney offers a full account of what he calls "the 78 r.

Recorded Music in American Life

By examining the interplay between recorded music and the key social, political, and economic forces in America during the phonograph's rise and fall as the dominant medium of popular recorded sound, he addresses such vital issues as the place of multiculturalism in the phonograph's history, the roles of women as record-player listeners and performers, the belated commercial legitimacy of rhythm-and-blues recordings, the "hit record" phenomenon in the wake of the Great Depression, the origins of the rock-and-roll revolution, and the shifting place of popular recorded music in America's personal and cultural memories.

Throughout the book, Kenney argues that the phonograph and the recording industry served neither to impose a preference for high culture nor a degraded popular taste, but rather expressed a diverse set of sensibilities in which various sorts of people found a new kind of pleasure. A book such as this is long overdue, and Kenney's work will open the field of study in a most appropriate and scholarly manner.

This is a valuable and useful contribution to the study of American life. This book provides the first systematic attempt at integrating the entertainment medium broadly into twentieth-century American life. From Tin Foil to High Fidelity Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford.

Additional Information

This book is a must read for those interested in the recording industry or the history of popular music. By examining the interplay between recorded music and the key social, political, and economic forces in America during the phonograph's rise and fall as the dominant medium of popular recorded sound, he addresses such vital issues as the place of multiculturalism in the phonograph's history, the roles of women as record-player listeners and performers, the belated commercial legitimacy of rhythm-and-blues recordings, the "hit record" phenomenon in the wake of the Great Depression, the origins of the rock-and-roll revolution, and the shifting place of popular recorded music in America's personal and cultural memories. Such are the questions that arise when we stop taking for granted the phenomenon of recorded music and the phonograph itself. Ebook This title is available as an ebook. It also sets a high standard for graduate students seeking to read works that incorporate excellent research technique and understanding with superb writing. Amusement, not dictation, would be the primary function of recording, promoted by a whole new entertainment industry.

It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide. Academic Skip to main content.

  • Cruisers;
  • The Galahad Factor;
  • Healer (The LaNague Federation Book 5);
  • .
  • ;
  • .
  • Recorded Music in American Life - Paperback - William Howland Kenney - Oxford University Press.

Choose your country or region Close. Ebook This title is available as an ebook.

  • ?
  • Adobe AIR Bible!
  • .
  • Resurrection!
  • A Far Country.

To purchase, visit your preferred ebook provider. Oxford Scholarship Online This book is available as part of Oxford Scholarship Online - view abstracts and keywords at book and chapter level. Recorded Music in American Life The Phonograph and Popular Memory, William Howland Kenney Here, Kenney examines the interplay between recorded music and the key social, political, and economic forces in America during the era of the phonograph's rise and decline as the dominant medium of popular recorded sound--from the appearance of the first commercial recordings to the postwar years when the industry became more complex and less powerful.

Chicago Jazz William Howland Kenney.

Also Available As:

Recorded Music in American Life. The Phonograph and Popular Memory, William Howland Kenney. Have records, compact discs, and other sound. Recorded Music in American Life: The Phonograph and Popular Memory, [William Howland Kenney] on bolstergroup.com *FREE* shipping on.