Iphigenia in Forest Hills: Anatomy of a Murder Trial


The Bukharian Jewish community in Queens makes for interesting reading and I wish the author had sp Quick, good read; very well written in a conversational style a la the New Yorker. The Bukharian Jewish community in Queens makes for interesting reading and I wish the author had spent more time talking about it. Like a lot of Russian novels, it was not always easy to keep the characters straight! Feb 14, Libby rated it liked it.

Noted journalist Janet Malcolm writes about the trial of Dr.

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Mazoltov Borukhova, accused of using a hitman, Mikhail Malleyev, to kill her ex-husband, orthodontist Daniel Malakov, who had been awarded custody of their young daughter Michelle by a judge. She exposes a lot of the problems with the legal system that convicted both Borukhova and Malleyev both serving life sentences without parole as well as opening a curtain on the insular Bukharan-Jewish community of Forest Hills. It's a fascinati Noted journalist Janet Malcolm writes about the trial of Dr. It's a fascinating read about a sordid situation--one shudders to think of what will become of Michelle after seeing her father killed before her eyes.

Mar 06, Christina rated it it was ok Shelves: I found this book kind of flat. It reads like someone's notes from the courtroom gallery, but doesn't seem to really formulate a story with an end. In being nonpartisan, Janet Malcolm more or less offloads the facts she's gathered and ends the book without making any of the players involved sympathetic with the exception of the little girl, Michelle. Nov 14, Simone rated it it was amazing.

anatomy of a murder film ending ~[CINEMA]~ 31.03.2016

An intelligent, engaging study of the modern American justice system that will educate and horrify and amaze. Jan 22, Alix rated it liked it.

Iphigenia in Forest Hills: Anatomy of a Murder Trial

On the surface, Iphigenia in Forest Hills is about the trial and conviction of Mazoltuv Borukhova for the murder of her ex-husband. The social services and child advocacy services and legal services and even On the surface, Iphigenia in Forest Hills is about the trial and conviction of Mazoltuv Borukhova for the murder of her ex-husband. And of course there is Iphigenia - in this story, Michelle - the child caught amidst clashing adults who are themselves caught within the epitome of a dysfunctional system.

The murder is a tragedy, of course, but here it functions primarily as a setting or a central point from which Malcolm works backward, following the innumerable threads that led to the murder and the trial, as well as forward, considering briefly the afterlives of the people she has come to know in one way or another. Three stars mainly because I felt its shortness was unfortunate: Malcolm could almost certainly have expanded her observations of the systems she considers and brought a bit more depth to their portrayal — but for a quick read it packs a punch.

May 15, Wouter rated it liked it Shelves: Iphinegia in Forest Hills is het verslag van een rechtszaak waarbij een echtscheidingszaak en bijkomende voogdijkwestie uitmondt in moord. Wat volgt is het verslag van het strafproces door de beroemde journalist Janet Malcolm en een reconstructie van de gebeurtenissen in aanloop daartoe. Ze beschrijft d Iphinegia in Forest Hills is het verslag van een rechtszaak waarbij een echtscheidingszaak en bijkomende voogdijkwestie uitmondt in moord.

Malcolm schrijft elegant en weet vanaf de eerste pagina je mee te voeren in de maalmolen van het Amerikaanse rechtssysteem. Hoewel ze geen uitspraken doet over de schuldkwestie, ligt haar sympathie zonder meer bij de moeder.

Het boek is dan ook eerder een reflectie op het rechtssysteem en, in mindere mate, op het bedenkelijke politieonderzoek naar de moord dan een poging de ware toedracht van de moord boven tafel te krijgen. In dat opzicht zou je Malcolm kunnen verwijten meer een karakterstudie te hebben willen schrijven dan echt een misdaadverslag te leveren, maar dat is juist wat haar werkwijze volstrekt sui generis maakt. Jan 26, Peter Landau rated it really liked it. But the case of a Bukharan immigrant doctor accused of hiring a hitman to kill her orthodontist ex-husband because of his alleged abuse of their daughter is only the clay with which Malcolm forms her thoughts on storytelling.

Iphigenia in Forest Hills: Anatomy of a Murder Trial by Janet Malcolm – review

Aug 26, Ruth rated it really liked it. I can't decide how I feel about this book. It was very easy to read, rich in description and detail, yet I don't know whether I trust Janet Malcolm's impressions. She persuaded me that Mazoltuv Borukhova was convicted unjustly, because she planted a seed of doubt in my mind that she did the crime of which she was convicted. She argued this so strongly that I couldn't figure out how anyone would have convicted her, honestly.

It felt like a novel by an unreliable narrator, only it was a non-fictio I can't decide how I feel about this book. It felt like a novel by an unreliable narrator, only it was a non-fiction book in the voice of a sympathetic, intelligent, but somehow also unreliable reporter. Desafio Lendo Mais Mulheres Desafio Lendo Mais Mulheres: Jul 20, Melissa rated it it was ok. I don't know what this book was supposed to be about. It details a murder trial that seems pretty clear but never really comes to a conclusion or even an end. It literally just stops in the middle of s scene. Jan 20, Kate rated it liked it Shelves: Reads like a New Yorker article not a book.

Detailed account of Borukhova's trial and some of it's aftermath. I really liked Malcolm's writing style. It is super intelligent and factual, but she also inserts herself just enough to add touches of humor and a very human element. Jul 21, Robert rated it it was ok. A very good reporter's excellent take on the American criminal justice system via the story of a trial of two defendants in a rather high profile at the time murder case from Forest Hills, Queens. On trial are a well -respected woman doctor, a member of a small sect of Orthodox Jews and her alleged hit man, accused of killing the doctor's husband, a member of the same sect.

Ms Malcolm explores all the many influences, unfortunately not limited to the quality of the "facts" adduced at trial, th A very good reporter's excellent take on the American criminal justice system via the story of a trial of two defendants in a rather high profile at the time murder case from Forest Hills, Queens.

Ms Malcolm explores all the many influences, unfortunately not limited to the quality of the "facts" adduced at trial, that affect the outcome of American judicial fact finding especially by juries, and the application by the court in the form of instructions to the jury, of the law to those "facts". But that's human nature, which can be removed from no aspect of our lives. This is not a true crime book and Janet Malcolm is not an author who seeks to entertain.

Nor is she the sort of author who fades into the background of her writing. More often than not, a critique of any of her books becomes a critique of her. Fortunately Malcolm is as ready to rumble as any star of the WWE. To read any of Malcolm's work for a dispassionate recitation of events is to be disappointed and to, well, miss the point. She seeks to understand what the events reveal about us. She does n This is not a true crime book and Janet Malcolm is not an author who seeks to entertain. She does not stand on the sidelines and pretend to be unbiased - she has an opinion and she draws conclusions.

The bare facts are: Mazoltuv Borukhova is accused of hiring an assassin to murder his husband in front of her.

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"Astringent and absorbing Iphigenia in Forest Hills casts, from its first pages, a genuine spell — the kind of spell to which Ms. Malcolm's admirers (and I am. Anatomy of a Murder Trial. Janet Malcolm. View Inside "Iphigenia in Forest Hills is another dazzling triumph from Janet Malcolm. Here, as always, Malcolm's .

Borukhova and the hired killer are put on trial, a highly imperfect trial in Malcolm's estimation. Her idiosyncratic take is on every page: No one will ever be able to prove it. But that's exactly what happened. We construct our own narrative, based on our own experiences and prejudices. We may seek the truth, but our version becomes the truth. We are connoisseurs of certainty. Malcolm wants to know what drove events and expands her search beyond what is said in court. If you haven't like Malcolm's earlier books, you won't like this one.

I have a soft spot for a writer who can sidle up to a prospective interview and offer the following reporter's come on "I went up to him and asked if Anna Freud's project Apr 18, Marisa rated it really liked it Shelves: I won this through First Reads. One question that came up for me while reading Iphigenia in Forest Hills is to what extent culture is considered in the courtroom.

Are juries informed about certain traditions, rites, etc. Upon completion of my reading, I felt that any such information would most likely be used to whatever advantage each side could see to gain from it. One thing Malcolm's book does I won this through First Reads. One thing Malcolm's book does is highlight the artificiality of the courtroom setting. Ezra Malakov, the murdered man's uncle, points out with some annoyance the unnecessary drama created by repeated questions and rewordings.

He likens being asked the same question multiple times to being treated like a child. The one person I was most concerned about while reading this book was the young daughter, Michelle. I felt her presence was lacking; which is maybe exactly what Malcolm intended.

On page , she states that, "Unlike a lawyer for an adult, who is required to put his client's wishes before his own, the lawyer for a child labors under no such constraint". I find this, if true, to be highly unfortunate. Although I liked the general flow of Malcolm's writing, I thought the ending was abrupt and did not make sense. Of course, maybe it was only the case that Malcolm was using a certain literary method that I could not appreciate. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

If you're an existing print subscriber, and you have never logged in, you may need to activate your Schwartz Media account. We're here to help. By Michelle de Kretser. June By Michelle de Kretser Share. By Michelle de Kretser Share. The return of the Moree Boomerangs Paul Connolly The First on the Ladder arts project is turning things around for a rugby club and the local kids.

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Benedict Cumberbatch is perfect as the imperfect Patrick Melrose Craig Mathieson The actor brings together his trademark raffishness and sardonic superiority in this searing miniseries. Are you enjoying the Monthly? Subscribe to the Monthly and enjoy full digital access. Comments View the discussion thread. The first is Jane Austen. The second is Janet Malcolm, who is a staff writer at the New Yorker , and whose subjects have included, over the years, psychoanalysis "the impossible profession" , Sylvia Plath, Anton Chekhov and Gertrude Stein.

Malcolm's masterpiece, though, is The Journalist and the Murderer , a brilliant and pitiless examination of journalistic ethics built around the lawsuit filed by Jeffrey MacDonald, a convicted killer, against Joe McGinniss, author of a book about his crimes. Yet a full two decades on, she is still at it. The truth might be elusive. It might even — like psychoanalysis — be "impossible". But this doesn't make the idea of pursuing it any easier to resist; some of us are just born beady.

As she puts it with characteristic understatement in a rare interview in the latest Paris Review: Malcolm's new book, Iphigenia in Forest Hills , tells the story of the joint murder trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, a year-old doctor, and Mikhail Mallayev, her year-old cousin by marriage whom she hired to shoot her estranged husband, Daniel Malakov, in The trial took place in Queens, where Malcolm followed its every twist for the New Yorker. Trials, of course, are about finality: But Malcolm is not so easily pleased.

It's not particularly that she doubts the guilt of those in the dock. It's more that, in this courtroom, motives are so confusingly muddy.

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Even the judge, Robert Hanophy, behaves badly, making his bias in favour of the prosecution too clear, it is suggested, because he has a Caribbean holiday booked, and is determined to make his flight as the trial draws to a close, Hanophy forces Borukhova's lawyer to prepare his summation overnight; the prosecutor has the whole weekend to wrestle with his. From her reporter's seat, Malcolm observes that a trial is merely "a contest between competing narratives". The most consistent story wins, not the truth: